Polytheism can be Simple

LOKI: HE IS.
Sigyn: She is.
Laufey: She is.
Bragi: He is.
Tyr: He is.
Frigga: She is.
Njördr: He is.

All the other Gods and Goddesses that I do not know personally yet: They are.

Every God and Goddess: They are.

And that is really all that matters.

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

(After Bias of Priene, ~6th century BC: Περὶ θεῶν λέγε, ὡς εἰσἰν.)

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About Myriad

Myriad Hallaug Lokadís
This entry was posted in Devotional, Polytheism and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Polytheism can be Simple

  1. Raven says:

    Okay- how about when referring to Loki as mother as Sleipnir? :D

    • Myriad says:

      :) sorry, I’m not sure I see your question? For me it’s like: Sleipnir’s mother is Loki. Loki is Sleipnir’s mother. But that doesn’t detract from His being. Of course He’s still all the things He is! And I love Him dearly. But I don’t presume to know what He is.

      It’s just that I don’t wanna argue about the nature of the Gods anymore, I don’t want to be told what to believe about the nature of the Gods, whether or not I actually agree with what I’m told. I don’t want to listen to people go on and on and ON anymore about how they’re right about the nature of the Gods, and how everybody who isn’t exactly on their page must therefore be completely wrong—and by saying “wrong” I’m editing out the insults, condescension, and condemnation that has been put forward—about the nature of the Gods. It’s delusional and full of hybris to presume that one has this kind of authority, and that kind of knowledge—the knowledge of the essence basically of what a God is.

      It is known today that there were many, many differing opinions about the nature of the Gods and what they were, many differing beliefs in pre-Christian Europe, even in groups of people practising the same religion. There was also no authority whatsoever that told anyone that they could only practise one religion, in one specific way. And sure enough, people used to practice a mix, and even heathenry as one religion was pracised heterogeneously all over the place. If that is so, then why do we apparently see the need to debate this now? This discussion and its style… It doesn’t seem heathen to me, and to be quite honest, it doesn’t seem European either. (Par for the course, as most of the people involved are not Europeans.)

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